IKEA Recalls Children's Swing

IKEA children's swing recall

Yet another children's product was recalled recently when the ever-popular IKEA announced a recall to the GUNGGUNG swing. This swing is meant to be hung from high surfaces, such as ceilings and door frames, allowing children to sit and swing indoors or outdoors. Unfortunately, these children's swings have suspension fittings that may break. This would lead to a child falling from the swing, posing a significant threat of injury to young users.

So far, there have been four reports of children falling from the swings after they broke while in use. One of those incidents led to a fractured leg. Thus far, there have been no incidents of injury reported in the United States as a result of this defective product. If you believe that you purchased this defective swing, check for article number 302.439.74 or supplier number 17915. The swing would have been made in Vietnam and has a permanent label on a IkEA recalled swing labelsuspension strap with the age recommendation of three to seven years old, the IKEA logo, and article/supplier numbers. Approximately 2,000 were sold in the U.S. between June and August of 2014. The unit cost would have been $20. If you have this swing installed at your home or know of someone that does, the swings should be taken down immediately. IDEA stores nationwide are offering refunds for the swing by calling (888)966-4532 or online at www.ikea-usa.com under the recall link.

Children's product recalls are some of the most important to keep up with as a parent because it is our responsibility to keep our children safe. According to the organization Kids In Danger (KID), there was a children's product recall every three and a half days in 2012. Even more terrifying is the fact that most parents report hearing about recalls twice a month at most. So the most dangerous aspect of children's product recalls seems to be keeping up to date with them. In 2007, 30 million unites of 104 different types of toys were recalls by manufacturing companies. It is important that parents stay up-to-date with the toy and children's product recalls and defects so that injuries can be prevented in our youth.

We urge readers to do your own research at SaferProducts.gov. You can also sign up for safety updates at KidsInDanger.org. If your child has been injured by a product that you believe was defective or has been recently recalled, the manufacturer may be held liable for those injuries. For more information, call (770) 427-5498.