The Affects of Alcohol Listed By Blood Alcohol Level

Unfortunately, Georgia citizens choose to operate vehicles under the influence of drugs or alcohol every day. In their minds, this decision to drive under the influence affects only themselves. In reality, everyone around them may be affected in the long run as a result of this mistake. In 2008 alone, there were approximately 416 fatalities as a result of alcohol impaired drivers in Georgia. The counties with the highest numbers of fatalities were Fulton, Gwinnett, DeKalb, and Cobb. This hits home for the staff members at Jones & Swanson because it directly affects our home counties.

These statistics may cause one to wonder why Georgians make the decision to drive drunk or inebriated. Perhaps it is because they are unaware of the true affects that alcohol has on one's body. Recently, Yahoo! Health posted an article describing the affect that alcohol has on one's system in regards to the number of drinks and blood alcohol level. The affects were as follows, based on a male between the weights of 180 and 200 pounds during a one hour time span:

  • Blood alcohol level of 0.02% (usually about two drinks): one begins to lose their sense of judgment and their decision making skills begin to lack. Stopping here could potentially improve one's health.
  • Blood alcohol level of 0.05% (usually about three drinks): Inhibitions decrease and spontaneity becomes more common due to a condensed stimulation in the right inferior frontal cortex.
  • Blood alcohol level of 0.07% (usually about four drinks): one begins having difficulties assessing dangers and rewards because of their brain's lessening ability to pay attention to bad criticism.
  • Blood alcohol level of 0.08% (usually about five drinks): People start to forget things, as their memories begin to shut off. Details of what happened an hour ago becomes foggier than it normally would be. More importantly, the section of the brain called the amygdala, or the cautionary system for peril, begins to disengage.
  • Blood alcohol level of 0.10% (usually about six drinks): One begins to have problems maintaining balance, especially side to side. Aggressiveness also increases at this point.
  • Blood alcohol level of 0.11% (usually about six drinks): Motor control becomes problematic at this point, and one's moods become embellished. This is due to the withholding of water in one's frontal lobe, as well as in other areas of the brain.
  • Blood alcohol level of 0.15% (usually about seven drinks): Nausea and vomiting are often experienced at this point. The toxins within your body are being expelled by your stomach.
  • Blood alcohol level of 0.20% (usually about ten drinks): This is the point in which blacking out occurs in many that are intoxicated. One's memory is significantly altered, if not completely debilitated.
  • Blood alcohol level of 0.25% (usually about 12 drinks): At this point, one's body can become numb. This often leads to uncontrollable urination and highly impaired reflexes.
  • Blood alcohol level of 0.30% (usually about 16 drinks): More than likely, you have no idea where you are at this point. Muscle coordination, blurred vision, and convulsions are common at this level of intoxication. Many people pass out and often must be hospitalized.
  • Blood alcohol level of 0.35% (usually about 18 drinks): This level of impairment is comparable to the amount one would experience under surgical anesthesia.
  • Blood alcohol level above 0.40% (usually more than 20 drinks): Gag reflexes are blocked, so this is the stage in which people choke on their own vomit. You are risking coma and death at this level of intoxication.

Jones & Swanson urges Georgians to think twice before driving under the influence of alcohol. You are not only putting yourself at danger, but everyone on the roads around you as well. By educating our Cobb County community, we hope to prevent these mistakes from being made. If you or someone you know have been injured or killed in an auto accident as a result of another person operating a vehicle under the influence, contact our experienced injury attorneys Andrew W. Jones or M. Chase Swanson today for a free consultation and free information on what steps you should take next.