Intoxicated Pedestrians Often Cause Automobile Accidents

There is a great deal of information available to the general public discouraging operating a vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. It is well known that many times Georgia automobile crashes are caused by drunk drivers, so there are a variety of programs in place to discourage the act.

Something that many Georgians fail to realize is that an intoxicated pedestrian may pose just as much a threat to themselves as an intoxicated driver does. When pedestrians under the influence of alcohol or drugs are near motor vehicles, there are many risks involved. The NHTSA recently detailed a study that showed that drunken pedestrians are involved in over 1/3 of all fatal pedestrian crashes. This percentage is nearly the same as the amount of drunk driving automobile fatalities. This shows that alcohol is not only dangerous when drivers consume too much, but poses just as much threat when pedestrians are intoxicated while in the vicinity of automobiles.

Pedestrian crashes are an unfortunate reality in the state of Georgia and across the nation. In 2009, there were 150 pedestrian traffic fatalities in Georgia. Many of these may have been due to the pedestrian's intoxicated state at the time of the crash. Alcohol significantly impairs one's judgment, sense of perception, judgment of distance and speed, and coordination. Each of these impairments significantly increases one's chance of being involved in a pedestrian-automobile crash.

The best way to prevent an accident due to intoxication, whether driving or walking, is to know your limits. If you do become significantly intoxicated, make use of a designated driver, public transportation, or call a cab. You're not only protecting yourself by being responsible, but those around you on busy metro-Atlanta roadways as well.

If you or someone you know have been injured in an automobile crash, pedestrian or otherwise, and believe that someone else is as fault, contact Jones & Swanson today for a free consultation.