National Safety Month: Week 1

This month is National Safety Month, so Jones & Swanson is taking part by highlighting a few common safety concerns. All year around, our personal injury law firm is committed to heightening the safety of Georgians, especially here in our metro-Atlanta city of Marietta. This commitment stems from the many severely injured victims that we speak with every day. Callers to our office have injuries stemming from car wrecks, falls, dog bites, and even on-the-job accidents. These injuries range from lacerations and bruising to broken bones and nerve damage and often include permanent scarring both physically and mentally. It is important to us that we educate our Cobb County community so that unnecessary injuries can be avoided at all costs.

In celebration of National Safety Month, the National Safety Council and many other organizations separate safety topics by week. In addition to the topics of safety listed below, Jones & Swanson would also like to promote workplace safety throughout the month of June. Many injury claims that we represent clients in occur in the workplace. We have represented clients who were injured in auto accidents while on the job, fell at work, and more. Please consider these workplace safety tips in an effort to protect yourself and others at work.

  • June 1-7 is prescription drug abuse prevention week
  • June 8-14 serves to educated about preventing trip and fall or slip and fall incidents
  • June 15-21 is geared towards educating people about the importance of being aware of surroundings
  • June 22-28 has a topic of distracted driving prevention
  • The remainder of the month of June is considered a "bonus" and is dedicated to the topic of summertime safety.

Because this week's topic is prevention of prescription drug abuse, we would like this week's blog posting to be in regards to this subject. Most Americans are prescribed medication at some point in their lives to battle an illness or to better their well-being. As a patient of prescription drugs, you have a responsibility to yourself to take preventative action so that you are not faced with an addiction. First, you should always educated your doctor about medications you are already taking before allowing them to prescribe you another medication. Once you receive the prescription, always follow the directions provided to you on the bottle. The packaging should also list any other medications that should not be mixed with the prescribed prescription. Before you increase your dosage, you should discuss the reasoning with your doctor so that they can educate you on whether it is a good idea or not. Finally, you should never use someone else's medication no matter what your symptoms are. If you live with others, you should take proper steps to ensure that they do not use your medication by storing it in a safe location and keeping track of the amount of medicine you should have. When you no longer need your prescription drugs, proper disposal is very important. For your local medicine disposal location, visit www.awarerx.org.