Car Seat Recalls and Safety

Car Seat SafetyIn honor of Child Passenger Safety Week, which lasts from September 13-19, we are educating readers on recent child safety seat recalls, safety tips, and informative events.

Britax Child Safety, Inc. announced a car seat safety recall on various Advocate ClickTight, Marathon ClickTight, and Boulevard ClickTight model seats in August. Affected convertible child safety seats would have manufacture dates of August 1, 2014 through July 29, 2015. The suspected defect involves the seats’ harness adjuster buttons, and while no injuries have yet been reported, Britax is voluntarily offering complimentary remedy kits to owners of recalled seats. The adjuster buttons on seats included in this defect may possibly remain in the “release” position even after tightening a child into the seat. This could lead to a loosening of the shoulder harnesses when children are supposed to be securely fastened. To find out whether your Britax ClickTight Convertible car seat is included in this recall, visit us.britax.com.

On Tuesday, another child safety seat recall was announced by Recaro Child Safety that may affect approximately 173,000 carseats. Affected units include ProRide and Performance Ride Convertible car seats manufactured after April 9, 2010 and before June 9, 2015. These child safety seats failed to completely fulfill safety requirements required by Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 213, which essentially means that in the event of a crash, these car seats may fail to protect children. Details included in the recall state that shells of these carseats may separate from the tether in an accident.

During Child Passenger Safety Week, various organizations are teaming up to promote heightened safety for children under the age of 13. Between 2009 and 2013, 3,335 vehicle occupants age 13 or less lost their lives in crashes. Each day of 2013, 345 child vehicle occupants experienced injuries in motor vehicle accidents. Fortunately, child safety seats provide amplified safety for child passengers in cars, trucks, and SUVs. It is estimated that 263 lives of children 5 and under were saved by child restraints. Carseats and boosters diminish the threat of lethal injury by 71% for infants and 54% for toddlers.

Just using child safety restraints is not enough, though. Each Georgia driver who transports a child under 13 years old should appropriately educate themselves so that they are aware of appropriate safety methods and procedures. Many parents and guardians believe they buckle their children in correctly, when in fact they are missing important steps and details. National Seat Check Saturday is this Saturday, September 19. To find car seat check-up locations and events, visit www.safekids.org.